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10 Foods High In Protein And Fat

Protein and fat are two of the three macronutrients. With these foods high in protein and fat you will get a lot closer to your daily goals.

There are actually a wide variety of whole foods that can help you get both of these nutrients in one go. From a high-level view, the food groups that contain a lot of grams of protein and fat per 100 grams are nuts and seeds > cheese > meat and fish > 1 exceptional legume.

There are of course individual differences within these categories but this ranking gives you a better idea of what you are looking for. Below you can find 10 foods high in protein and fat from each of these categories with other nutritional details.

If you are on a very strict low-carb diet, keep in mind that nuts and seeds also contain moderate amounts of carbs. In that case the other options in this list may be better choices.

Also keep in mind that the actual nutrient quantities in meat will vary. Even 2 pieces of meat in the same area of 2 different animals can vary in nutritional values. Reasons for this include what the animals eat, and just genetic variability (1, 2).

1. Pumpkin seeds

Most people know about and eat pumpkins but the pumpkin seeds in them are often forgotten. This is unfortunate because they are a powerhouse of nutrients, especially in plant-based protein but also in their fat content.

You do want to keep in mind that pumpkin seeds are also relatively high in total calories.

100 grams of roasted pumpkin seed kernels contains (3):

  • Protein + fat: 75.1 grams
  • Calories: 522
  • Protein: 33 grams
  • Carbs: 13.4 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 3.9 grams
  • Fat: 42.1 grams
  • Manganese: 151% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Magnesium: 134% of the DV
  • Phosphorus: 117% of the DV
  • Iron: 83% of the DV
  • Copper: 69% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Pumpkin seeds are especially high in magnesium compared to other foods. Magnesium is an important nutrient many people can use a lot more of.

2. Macadamia nuts

Next on the list, there are the macadamia nuts. They are a great food to get a lot of calories per 100 grams, for some people that is great, for most people it’s not.

Macadamia nuts make up for it in fats but they are one of the nuts on the low side when it comes to protein. If you are interested in foods like that you can check out the list of nuts high in protein.

100 grams of macadamia nuts contains (4):

  • Protein + fat: 83.7 grams
  • Calories: 718
  • Protein: 7.9 grams
  • Carbs: 14.2 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 8.6 grams
  • Fat: 75.8 grams
  • Manganese: 207% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Thiamin: 80% of the DV
  • Copper: 38% of the DV
  • Magnesium: 33% of the DV
  • Iron: 20% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Besides being high in protein and fat macadamia nuts also contain a lot of other valuable nutrients.

3. Pecans

Pecans are a relatively low net-carb nut. You get the number of net carbs in food by taking the total amount of carbs and subtracting the amount of fiber.

Together with being high in fat and protein pecans make a great food option for low-carb diets like the keto diet.

100 grams of pecans contains (5):

  • Protein + fat: 81.2 grams
  • Calories: 691
  • Protein: 9.2 grams
  • Carbs: 14 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 9.6 grams
  • Fat: 72 grams
  • Manganese: 225% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Copper: 60% of the DV
  • Thiamin: 44% of the DV
  • Magnesium: 30% of the DV
  • Zinc: 30% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Pecans are a common ingredient for several dessert dishes like pecan pie. If losing weight and getting healthier are your primary goals it may be smarter to eat these nuts raw.

4. Sunflower seeds

Sunflower seeds are the next type of seeds on this list of foods high in protein and fat. If you want to save yourself some time you may want to choose hulled sunflower seeds.

100 grams of roasted sunflower seed kernels contains (6):

  • Protein + fat: 69.1 grams
  • Calories: 582
  • Protein: 19.3 grams
  • Carbs: 24.1 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 11.1 grams
  • Fat: 49.8 grams
  • Vitamin E: 130% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Phosphorus: 115% of the DV
  • Selenium: 113% of the DV
  • Manganese: 106% of the DV
  • Copper: 92% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Just like pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds have very impressive nutrient contents per 100 grams. This is helpful if you have trouble reaching your daily vitamin and mineral goals.

5. Gruyere cheese

Gruyere is a kind of hard, yellow cheese that originates in Switzerland. This is the first type of cheese on this list.

Cheeses are generally high in protein, high in fat, and low in carbs. This makes them a great food group for low-carb diets.

100 grams of gruyere cheese contains (7):

  • Protein + fat: 62.1 grams
  • Calories: 413
  • Protein: 29.8 grams
  • Carbs: 0.4 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 0 grams
  • Fat: 32.3 grams
  • Calcium: 101% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Phosphorus: 60% of the DV
  • Vitamin B12: 27% of the DV
  • Zinc: 26% of the DV
  • Selenium: 21% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Gruyere is a great cheese to use for baking, for example in dishes like quiche and cordon bleu. It is also suited for fondues, and as an ingredient in salads and pasta.

6. Parmesan cheese

Parmesan cheese is a hard cheese that originates in Italy that is one of the cheeses highest in protein. It is made from cow milk and usually ages between 12-36 months.

100 grams of parmesan cheese contains (8):

  • Protein + fat: 61.6 grams
  • Calories: 392
  • Protein: 35.8 grams
  • Carbs: 3.2 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 0 grams
  • Fat: 25.8 grams
  • Calcium: 118% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Phosphorus: 69% of the DV
  • Sodium: 67% of the DV
  • Selenium: 32% of the DV
  • Riboflavin: 20% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Most people eat parmesan cheese grated over their pasta dishes but you can also consume it on its own or stirred in soup.

7. Pheasant

A pheasant is a kind of bird you can find throughout the world. This is not one of the most popular meats but it can be a good addition to your diet to increase your protein and fat intake.

Meat and fish are types of foods that just have protein and fat.

100 grams of cooked pheasant contains (9):

  • Protein + fat: 44.5 grams
  • Calories: 247
  • Protein: 32.4 grams
  • Carbs: 0 grams
  • Fat: 12.1 grams
  • Niacin: 38% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Vitamin B6: 37% of the DV
  • Selenium: 30% of the DV
  • Phosphorus: 24% of the DV
  • Vitamin B12: 12% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

8. Lamb

The next meat on this list is lamb which is the meat of a sheep that is under one year old. Even though lamb is a bit lower on this list it still has the potential to be a great addition to increase your protein and fat intake.

100 grams of cooked ground lam contains (10):

  • Protein + fat: 44.4 grams
  • Calories: 283
  • Protein: 24.7 grams
  • Carbs: 0 grams
  • Fat: 19.7 grams
  • Vitamin B12: 43% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Selenium: 40% of the DV
  • Niacin: 34% of the DV
  • Zinc: 31% of the DV
  • Phosphorus: 20% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

9. Mackerel

Mackerel is a type of fatty fish found in a wide variety of geographical areas. On top of being a great source of protein a relatively high amount of the fat in mackerel comes from omega-3 fat.

100 grams of cooked mackerel contains (11):

  • Protein + fat: 35.8 grams
  • Calories: 201
  • Protein: 25.7 grams
  • Carbs: 0 grams
  • Fat: 10.1 grams
  • Vitamin B12: 70% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Selenium: 67% of the DV
  • Niacin: 53% of the DV
  • Riboflavin: 32% of the DV
  • Vitamin B6: 19% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

10. Soybeans

Soybeans, also called edamame when the soybean is still young, are a type of legume that stands out because of their higher fat content compared to other legumes.

Most other legumes are not as great as soybeans for increasing both your protein and fat intake.

100 grams of cooked soybeans contains (12):

  • Protein + fat: 25.6 grams
  • Calories: 173
  • Protein: 16.6 grams
  • Carbs: 9.9 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 6.0 grams
  • Fat: 9 grams
  • Manganese: 41% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Iron: 29% of the DV
  • Vitamin K: 24% of the DV
  • Phosphorus: 24% of the DV
  • Magnesium: 21% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Soybeans are also the main ingredient of the popular meat replacement tofu. Tofu is mostly popular in the Eastern kitchen but available all around the world.