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10 Foods High In Protein And Fiber

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Protein and fiber are two important nutrients. With these foods high in protein and fiber you will get a lot closer to your daily goals.

There are actually a wide variety of whole foods that can help you get both of these nutrients in one go. From a high-level view the food groups that contain a lot of grams of protein and fiber per 100 grams are nuts and seeds > legumes > dried fruit > whole grains.

There are of course individual differences within these categories but this ranking gives you a better idea of what you are looking for. Below you can find 10 foods high in protein and fiber from each of these categories with other nutritional details.

Because nuts and seeds are also generally high in calories you can combine some of the other food groups with other foods depending on your goals. For example, combining legumes with a protein source that does not contain any fiber but does contain a lot of protein like for example chicken.

1. Pumpkin seeds

Most people know about and eat pumpkins but the pumpkin seeds in them are often forgotten. This is unfortunate because they are a powerhouse of nutrients, especially in plant-based protein but also in their fiber content.

You do want to keep in mind that pumpkin seeds are also relatively high in total calories.

100 grams of roasted pumpkin seed kernels contains (1):

  • Protein + fiber: 36.9 grams
  • Calories: 522
  • Protein: 33 grams
  • Carbs: 13.4 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 3.9 grams
  • Fat: 42.1 grams
  • Manganese: 151% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Magnesium: 134% of the DV
  • Phosphorus: 117% of the DV
  • Iron: 83% of the DV
  • Copper: 69% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Pumpkin seeds are especially high in magnesium compared to other foods. Magnesium is an important nutrient many people can use a lot more of.

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2. Peanuts

While peanuts are botanically legumes, they are often considered nuts because of their nutrient profile. Peanuts are one of the most popular “nuts” in the world although this popularity is partly because of the existence of peanut butter.

100 grams of peanuts contains (2):

  • Protein + fiber: 34.3 grams
  • Calories: 567
  • Protein: 25.8 grams
  • Carbs: 16.1 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 8.5 grams
  • Fat: 49.2 grams
  • Manganese: 97% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Niacin: 60% of the DV
  • Folate: 60% of the DV
  • Copper: 57% of the DV
  • Thiamin: 43% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Besides being an amazing plant-based protein and fiber source, peanuts are one of the best nuts for weight loss.

A popular way to consume peanuts is peanut butter. If you eat peanuts that way make sure you generally avoid the peanut butters high in added sweeteners and oils if being healthy is one of your main goals.

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3. Almonds

Almonds are used to make many different products like almond milk, almond butter, and almond flour. Just eating almonds raw is a great way to increase your protein and fiber intake.

100 grams of almonds contains (3):

  • Protein + fiber: 33.4 grams
  • Calories: 575
  • Protein: 21.2 grams
  • Carbs: 21.7 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 12.2 grams
  • Fat: 49.4 grams
  • Vitamin E: 131% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Manganese: 114% of the DV
  • Magnesium: 67% of the DV
  • Riboflavin: 60% of the DV
  • Copper: 50% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Almonds have an impressive nutrient content, even compared to other nuts. That makes them extremely nutrient-dense compared to most other foods.

Some people love to eat their almonds covered in chocolate. This is a delicious way to eat them but not the greatest if losing weight is one of your goals.

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4. Sunflower seeds

Sunflower seeds are the next type of seeds on this list of foods high in protein and fiber. If you want to save yourself time you may want to choose hulled sunflower seeds.

100 grams of roasted sunflower seed kernels contains (4):

  • Protein + fiber: 30.4 grams
  • Calories: 582
  • Protein: 19.3 grams
  • Carbs: 24.1 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 11.1 grams
  • Fat: 49.8 grams
  • Vitamin E: 130% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Phosphorus: 115% of the DV
  • Selenium: 113% of the DV
  • Manganese: 106% of the DV
  • Copper: 92% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Just like pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds have very impressive nutrient contents per 100 grams. This is helpful if you have trouble reaching your daily vitamin and mineral goals.

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5. Natto

Natto is a fermented food made with soybeans that is popular in Japan. Many people who are not used to it have a problem with the taste of natto but if you like it, natto may be a helpful addition to your diet to increase protein and fiber intake.

Soybeans and many of the ways to prepare them are also generally high in protein and fiber.

100 grams of natto contains (5):

  • Protein + fiber: 23.1 grams
  • Calories: 212
  • Protein: 17.7 grams
  • Carbs: 14.4 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 5.4 grams
  • Fat: 11 grams
  • Manganese: 76% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Iron: 48% of the DV
  • Copper: 33% of the DV
  • Vitamin K: 29% of the DV
  • Magnesium: 29% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

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6. Cranberry beans (roman)

Cranberry beans, also often called Roman beans, have a great nutrient profile compared to other legumes. The protein and fiber in cranberry beans can definitely help you reduce hunger and cravings a lot.

100 grams of cooked cranberry beans contains (6):

  • Protein + fiber: 19.3 grams
  • Calories: 136
  • Protein: 9.3 grams
  • Carbs: 24.5 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 10.0 grams
  • Fat: 0.5 grams
  • Folate: 52% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Manganese: 18% of the DV
  • Thiamin: 14% of the DV
  • Phosphorus: 14% of the DV
  • Iron: 12% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

One of the advantages of cranberry beans over some of the other options on this list is that they are lower in calories. If you have trouble with overeating calories this food option may be what you are looking for.

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7. Dried figs

Dried fruits may be a surprising option for this list since they are generally not that high in protein. This is true but they do often contain a nice amount of fiber per 100 grams. This means these types of food do deserve a spot on a list of foods high in protein and fiber.

Figs are the first dried fruit option. This food is mostly consumed in its dried form because its whole form does not preserve that well.

100 grams of dried figs contains (7):

  • Protein + fiber: 13.1 grams
  • Calories: 249
  • Protein: 3.3 grams
  • Carbs: 63.9 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 9.8 grams
  • Fat: 0.9 grams
  • Manganese: 26% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Vitamin K: 19% of the DV
  • Potassium: 19% of the DV
  • Magnesium: 17% of the DV
  • Calcium: 16% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Other popular ways to eat dried figs include as the main ingredient of fig jam and as a fig roll, a biscuit with a filling made from figs. Unfortunately, both of these ways of eating figs are not great when trying to lose weight.

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8. Dried peaches

Peaches are the fruit with yellow or white flesh and tiny hairs on the skin. Again the amount of protein per 100 grams is not that impressive but the amount of fiber makes up for that.

100 grams of dried peaches contains (8):

  • Protein + fiber: 11.8 grams
  • Calories: 239
  • Protein: 3.6 grams
  • Carbs: 61.3 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 8.2 grams
  • Fat: 0.8 grams
  • Vitamin A: 43% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Potassium: 28% of the DV
  • Iron: 23% of the DV
  • Niacin: 22% of the DV
  • Vitamin K: 20% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

This applies to most dried fruits but some foods you can combine with dried peaches are yogurt, oatmeal, and smoothies.

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9. Bulgur

This whole grain may not be the most popular whole grain but bulgur can be helpful if you are trying to consume more protein and fiber. Bulgur is actually one of the whole grains highest in fiber.

In general whole grains contains nice amounts of protein and fiber but more or less all legumes contain more of these two nutrients per 100 grams. That being said, due to personal preference or other reasons you may choose to eat whole grains anyway.

100 grams of cooked bulgur contains (9):

  • Protein + fiber: 12.3 grams
  • Calories: 83
  • Protein: 3.1 grams
  • Carbs: 18.6 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 4.5 grams
  • Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Manganese: 30% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Magnesium: 8% of the DV
  • Niacin: 5% of the DV
  • Folate: 5% of the DV
  • Iron: 5% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

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10. Quinoa

Quinoa is botanically a seed but often described as a whole grain. In the health and weight loss world, quinoa is quickly rising in popularity.

100 grams of cooked quinoa contains (10):

  • Protein + fiber: 7.2 grams
  • Calories: 120
  • Protein: 4.4 grams
  • Carbs: 21.3 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 2.8 grams
  • Fat: 1.9 grams
  • Manganese: 32% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Magnesium: 16% of the DV
  • Phosphorus: 15% of the DV
  • Folate: 10% of the DV
  • Copper: 10% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Boiled quinoa is a very versatile ingredient. As an example boiled quinoa is a great addition to salads.

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