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11 Foods Low In Carbs And Low In Calories

Carbs and calories are two important nutritional details. With these foods you can consume a low amount of carbs while staying low in calories.

There are actually a wide variety of whole foods that can help you if your goal is to consume low amounts of carbs while keeping your calorie intake low. One thing to keep in mind is that you can define “low carb” in different ways.

One way foods can be “low carb” is by having a generally low amount of grams of carbs per 100 grams. Food groups like this that are at the same time relatively low in calories include vegetables, mushrooms, and fruits.

Another way foods can be “low carb” is by having a relatively low % of their total calories coming from carbs. Food groups like this that are at the same time relatively low in calories include seafood and other meats.

There are of course individual differences within these categories but knowing these food groups gives you a better idea of what you are looking for. There are also a few foods outside these categories that fit the description. Below you can find 11 foods low in carbs and low in calories with other nutritional details.

Don’t forget that carbs and calories are not the only important nutritional details. Protein, vitamins and minerals are examples of other nutrients you also need enough of.

1. Lettuce

Lettuce is a very popular leafy green vegetable that is often eaten as part of a salad. While its percentage of calories coming from carbs may be relatively high, the absolute number of both carbs and calories in lettuce is low.

100 grams of raw lettuce contains (1):

  • Calories: 15
  • Protein: 1.4 grams
  • Carbs: 2.8 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 1.3 grams
  • Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Vitamin K: 217% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Vitamin A: 148% of the DV
  • Vitamin C: 30% of the DV
  • Manganese: 13% of the DV
  • Folate: 10% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Another aspect of lettuce that stands out is its impressive nutrient profile.

2. White mushrooms

White mushrooms, also known as button mushrooms, are one of the most popular types of mushrooms. They can certainly fill you up without adding a lot of carbs or calories to your diet.

100 grams of raw white mushrooms contains (2):

  • Calories: 22
  • Protein: 3.1 grams
  • Carbs: 3.3 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 1 gram
  • Fat: 0.3 grams
  • Riboflavin: 24% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Niacin: 18% of the DV
  • Copper: 16% of the DV
  • Vitamin B5: 15% of the DV
  • Selenium: 13% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

3. Cucumber

Cucumbers are a popular plant that is botanically a fruit but used as a vegetable. Naming aside cucumbers are definitely a food low in carbs and calories. Cucumber is also a popular ingredient to flavor up water.

100 grams of raw cucumber contains (3):

  • Calories: 15
  • Protein: 0.7 grams
  • Carbs: 3.6 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 0.5 grams
  • Fat: 0.1 grams
  • Vitamin K: 21% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Vitamin C: 5% of the DV
  • Potassium: 4% of the DV
  • Manganese: 4% of the DV
  • Vitamin B5: 3% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

4. Oyster

Oyster is a type of low-calorie seafood that can be eaten both boiled and raw. There are even oysters specifically for harvesting pearls.

When consuming oysters you do have to keep your selenium intake in mind. There is a Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) of selenium. In simple words that means that too much selenium can cause negative side effects (4).

100 grams of cooked oyster contains (5):

  • Calories: 79
  • Protein: 7 grams
  • Carbs: 7.3 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 0 grams
  • Fat: 2.1 grams
  • Vitamin B12: 405% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Zinc: 301% of the DV
  • Selenium: 111% of the DV
  • Copper: 72% of the DV
  • Iron: 43% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

As you can see oysters are a nutrient powerhouse, especially when it comes to vitamin B12, zinc, and selenium.

5. Yogurt

Yogurt is a a food made by fermenting milk. Cow milk is the most popular but milk from other animals can be used too.

With yogurt, you do have to keep in mind that there can be differences in nutritional details from yogurt to yogurt. Some brands also add sugar to their yogurt. These are not a good idea if you want to keep your carb and calorie intake low.

100 grams of this example yogurt contains (6):

  • Calories: 61
  • Protein: 3.5 grams
  • Carbs: 4.7 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 0 grams
  • Fat: 3.3 grams
  • Calcium: 12% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Phosphorus: 9% of the DV
  • Riboflavin: 8% of the DV
  • Vitamin B12: 6% of the DV
  • Vitamin B5: 4% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

One of the great things about yogurt is that is easy to combine with other foods. Some great examples include fruit, whole grains, and even certain vegetables.

6. Shrimp

Shrimp are another kind of sea creature popular all around the world.

100 grams of cooked shrimp contains (7):

  • Calories: 99
  • Protein: 20.9 grams
  • Carbs: 0 grams
  • Fat: 1.1 grams
  • Selenium: 57% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Vitamin B12: 25% of the DV
  • Iron: 17% of the DV
  • Phosphorus: 14% of the DV
  • Niacin: 13% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

If your goal is to keep your carb and calorie intake low, you want to avoid deep-fried shrimp, shrimp marinated in a sugary mix, and consuming them with high-calorie dips.

7. Strawberry

Fruit is generally not known as a very low-carb friendly food group but certain options like strawberries may fit your carb intake. You do likely need to keep an eye on your portions.

100 grams of raw strawberries contains (8):

  • Calories: 32
  • Protein: 0.7 grams
  • Carbs: 7.7 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 2 grams
  • Fat: 0.3 grams
  • Vitamin C: 98% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Manganese: 19% of the DV
  • Folate: 6% of the DV
  • Potassium: 4% of the DV
  • Vitamin K: 3% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

8. Cottage cheese

Cottage cheese is a kind of cheese made from “cheese curd”, moist pieces of curdled milk, and other ingredients that vary from brand to brand. Most cheeses are relatively high in calories but cottage cheese is an exception.

100 grams of cottage cheese contains (9):

  • Calories: 98
  • Protein: 11.1 grams
  • Carbs: 3.4 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 0 grams
  • Fat: 4.3 grams
  • Phosphorus: 16% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Sodium: 15% of the DV
  • Selenium: 14% of the DV
  • Riboflavin: 10% of the DV
  • Calcium: 8% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

9. Cod

Cod is a popular kind of fish with different species that live in different areas. The liver of this fish can be processed into cod liver oil, a kind of fish oil consumed for its health benefits.

While the number of calories in cod may look slightly higher compared to some of the other options, generally speaking cod is still a low-calorie food.

100 grams of Atlantic cooked cod contains (10):

  • Calories: 105
  • Protein: 22.8 grams
  • Carbs: 0 grams
  • Fat: 0.9 grams
  • Selenium: 54% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Vitamin B12: 18% of the DV
  • Vitamin B6: 14% of the DV
  • Phosphorus: 14% of the DV
  • Niacin: 13% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

You can easily implement cod in a wide variety of recipes. It can for example be your protein source of choice in salads.

10. Eggs

Eggs are part of many low-carb food lists and for a good reason. They offer a wide variety of important nutrients while being very filling. If you or members of your family have a history of high cholesterol you might want to avoid eggs anyway.

100 grams of hard-boiled eggs contains (11):

  • Calories: 155
  • Protein: 12.6 grams
  • Carbs: 1.1 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 0 grams
  • Fat: 10.6 grams
  • Selenium: 44% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Riboflavin: 30% of the DV
  • Vitamin B12: 19% of the DV
  • Phosphorus: 17% of the DV
  • Vitamin B5: 14% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

11. Chicken

Chicken is one of the most popular dietary protein sources around the world. There are more chickens in the world than any other bird (12). Again the number of calories may seem a bit high compared to the other options. However, chicken is one of the lowest-calorie meats out there.

100 grams of cooked chicken breast contains (13):

  • Calories: 165
  • Protein: 31 grams
  • Carbs: 0 grams
  • Fat: 3.6 grams
  • Niacin: 69% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Selenium: 39% of the DV
  • Vitamin B6: 30% of the DV
  • Phosphorus: 23% of the DV
  • Vitamin B5: 10% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

The list of preparation methods and recipes for chicken is almost endless. This is great if you are someone who appreciates taste variety in your diet.