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15 Of The Lowest-Carb Fruits For A Keto Diet

When eating low-carb you limit the amount of carbs you eat daily. Can you eat fruits on low-carb diets and if so, which ones are the best?

Carbohydrates or carbs in short are one of the three macronutrients. Keeping your carb intake low can offer benefits. You can fit in many types of fruits on low-carb diets and on top of that they can offer a few valuable nutrients.

Are fruits OK on low-carb diets like keto?

The amounts of carbs in fruits per 100 grams vary a lot from type of fruit to type of fruit. In general, you can fit in certain amounts of fruits but you will likely have to exercise some portion control.

Fruits can also be OK on strict low-carb diets like the keto diet but you will have to keep portions small and choose the lowest-carb fruits.

There are other food groups like vegetables, mushrooms, cheese, animal meats, fish, etc. that can offer bigger quantities of nutrients for fewer carbs. But fruits can contain specific micronutrients like specific antioxidants that are slightly harder to find in other low-carb foods.

In general it is a good idea to get nutrients from a variety of food groups.

Below you can find a list of fruits ranked from lowest to highest in net carbs, total carbs minus carbs from fiber, per 100 grams. This ranking does not take into account total calories. If you are interested in a ranking like that you can check out the list of the best fruits for weight loss.

Keep in mind that if your goal with eating low-carb is losing weight it is likely OK to go over your carb limit every once in a while if that means being able to consume nutrients that are beneficial for your metabolism and health.

1. Avocado

To some people this may come as a surprise but avocados are considered to be a fruit. Avocados do have a rather unique nutrition profile for a fruit, they are relatively low in net carbs and high in valuable nutrients. They do contain an above average number of calories so you also don’t want to overdo it with avocados.

100 grams of avocado contains (1):

  • Net carbs: 1.8 grams
  • Calories: 160
  • Protein: 2 grams
  • Carbs: 8.5 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 6.7 grams
  • Fat: 14.7 grams
  • Vitamin K: 26% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Folate: 20% of the DV
  • Vitamin C: 17% of the DV
  • Vitamin B5: 14% of the DV
  • Potassium: 14% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

A popular way to eat avocados is guacamole, a dip with avocados as the main ingredient. Guacamole made with the right ingredients is keto-friendly but keep in mind that many store-bought brands add ingredients like sugar which make it less keto-friendly.

2. Blackberries

The next on this list, blackberries, may not be the lowest in calories on this list but due to the fiber in them, they are the second-lowest in net carbohydrates and the lowest-carb berry. On top of that, they contain nice amounts of vitamins and minerals. A great combination for a low-carb diet like a keto diet.

The micronutrients in blackberries can offer a wide variety of health benefits (2, 3). One small study even found that blackberries may promote fat oxidation and improve insulin sensitivity (4).

100 grams of raw blackberries contains (5):

  • Net carbs: 4.9 grams
  • Calories: 43
  • Protein: 1.4 grams
  • Carbs: 10.2 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 5.3 grams
  • Fat: 0.5 grams
  • Vitamin C: 35% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Manganese: 32% of the DV
  • Vitamin K: 25% of the DV
  • Copper: 8% of the DV
  • Vitamin E: 6% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Like most berries, blackberries combine great with foods like yogurt and oatmeal. When trying to keep your carbohydrate intake low you generally want to avoid blackberry juice and dessert recipes with blackberries like muffins, pancakes, crumble, waffles, cake,…

3. Raspberries

Raspberries are a type of fruit available in a variety of colors but most commonly found in the color red. They are a great source of fiber and vitamin C and relatively low in net carbs.

100 grams of raw raspberries contains (6):

  • Net carbs: 5.4 grams
  • Calories: 52
  • Protein: 1.2 grams
  • Carbs: 11.9 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 6.5 grams
  • Fat: 0.7 grams
  • Vitamin C: 44% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Manganese: 34% of the DV
  • Vitamin K: 10% of the DV
  • Folate: 5% of the DV
  • Magnesium: 5% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

4. Strawberry

The next fruit on this list is strawberries. Besides being one of the most popular options, strawberries are also one of the lowest calorie fruits on this list. Unfortunately, the amount of fiber in strawberries is also one of the lower ones on this list.

In any case, for most people strawberries can be a good addition to a low-carb diet.

100 grams of raw strawberries contains (7):

  • Net carbs: 5.7 grams
  • Calories: 32
  • Protein: 0.7 grams
  • Carbs: 7.7 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 2 grams
  • Fat: 0.3 grams
  • Vitamin C: 98% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Manganese: 19% of the DV
  • Folate: 6% of the DV
  • Potassium: 4% of the DV
  • Vitamin K: 3% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Some people like to eat strawberries dipped in chocolate. While tasty, this combination is a lot more high carb and can slow down or stop the weight loss progress you may be looking for.

5. Lemon

Lemons are the lowest-calorie fruit on this list. Besides that, they also contain a good amount of fiber and vitamin C.

100 grams of raw lemon contains (8):

  • Net carbs: 6.5 grams
  • Calories: 29
  • Protein: 1.1 grams
  • Carbs: 9.3 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 2.8 grams
  • Fat: 0.3 grams
  • Vitamin C: 88% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Vitamin B6: 4% of the DV
  • Potassium: 4% of the DV
  • Thiamin: 3% of the DV
  • Folate: 3% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Most people probably don’t plan on snacking on raw lemons. One way to include more lemon into your day is by flavoring your daily water intake with it.

6. Watermelon

Watermelon is mostly popular as a great summer snack but you can also implement it into your daily diet as a relatively low-carb fruit option.

100 grams of raw watermelon contains (9):

  • Net carbs: 7.1 grams
  • Calories: 30
  • Protein: 0.6 grams
  • Carbs: 7.5 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 0.4 grams
  • Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Vitamin C: 13% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Vitamin A: 11% of the DV
  • Potassium: 3% of the DV
  • Thiamin: 2% of the DV
  • Vitamin B6: 2% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

Watermelon can also help you get to your daily water intake.

7. Cranberries

The next low-carb fruit is a popular option, especially during the holidays. Cranberries play a role in a wide variety of recipes ranging from raw on their own to cranberry sauce.

100 grams of raw cranberries contains (10):

  • Net carbs: 7.6 grams
  • Calories: 46
  • Protein: 0.4 grams
  • Carbs: 12.2 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 4.6 grams
  • Fat: 0.1 grams
  • Vitamin C: 22% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Manganese: 18% of the DV
  • Vitamin E: 6% of the DV
  • Vitamin K: 6% of the DV
  • Vitamin B6: 3% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

One of the most common ways to implement more cranberries in a diet is in the form of cranberry juice. With goals like consuming a low amount of carbs and trying to lose weight you generally want to stick to eating calories from solid food instead of drinking liquid calories. You certainly want to stay away from cranberry juice that contains a lot of added sugars and sweeteners.

8. Lime

Limes have very similar nutrients as lemons but due to a few small differences they are slightly higher in net carbs. That being said, lime definitely still counts as a low-carb fruit.

100 grams of raw lime contains (11):

  • Net carbs: 7.7 grams
  • Calories: 30
  • Protein: 0.7 grams
  • Carbs: 10.5 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 2.8 grams
  • Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Vitamin C: 48% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Calcium: 3% of the DV
  • Iron: 3% of the DV
  • Potassium: 3% of the DV
  • Copper: 3% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

9. Cantaloupe

Cantaloupe is a type of melon with orange flesh. This fruit does not contain that much fiber but cantaloupe can be helpful for consuming more vitamin A and vitamin C.

100 grams of raw cantaloupe contains (12):

  • Net carbs: 7.9 grams
  • Calories: 34
  • Protein: 0.8 grams
  • Carbs: 8.8 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 0.9 grams
  • Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Vitamin A: 68% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Vitamin C: 61% of the DV
  • Potassium: 8% of the DV
  • Folate: 5% of the DV
  • Niacin: 4% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

A combination that may sound strange at first but one that is popular for a reason is cantaloupe with some of your favorite ham.

10. Papaya

Papaya is an orange fruit with many black seeds. This fruit is not the most popular one on this list but it can be a good option if you want to eat some fruit on a low-carb diet.

100 grams of raw papaya contains (13):

  • Net carbs: 8 grams
  • Calories: 39
  • Protein: 0.6 grams
  • Carbs: 9.8 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 1.8 grams
  • Fat: 0.1 grams
  • Vitamin C: 103% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Vitamin A: 22% of the DV
  • Folate: 10% of the DV
  • Potassium: 7% of the DV
  • Vitamin E: 4% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

The most common way to eat papayas is raw, on their own, but they also make a great addition to dishes like salads and smoothies. Just make sure you find a low-carb-friendly version of these recipes.

11. Peach

As the list goes on, the net amount of carbs in the fruits slowly but surely increases. Even so, peaches can undoubtedly still be part of most low-carb diets as long as you limit portions.

100 grams of raw peach contains (14):

  • Net carbs: 8.4 grams
  • Calories: 39
  • Protein: 0.9 grams
  • Carbs: 9.9 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 1.5 grams
  • Fat: 0.3 grams
  • Vitamin C: 11% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Vitamin A: 7% of the DV
  • Potassium: 5% of the DV
  • Vitamin E: 4% of the DV
  • Niacin: 4% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

12. Guava

Guava is a tropical fruit that contains a great amount of fiber. This fruit comes in a variety of colors but most often guava has a green peel and pink flesh.

One of the things that really stands out in guava is its relatively high fiber content.

100 grams of raw guava contains (15):

  • Net carbs: 8.9 grams
  • Calories: 68
  • Protein: 2.5 grams
  • Carbs: 14.3 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 5.4 grams
  • Fat: 0.9 grams
  • Vitamin C: 381% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Vitamin A: 12% of the DV
  • Folate: 12% of the DV
  • Potassium: 12% of the DV
  • Copper: 11% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

13. Nectarine

Nectarines are closely related to peaches but they still vary enough to deserve their own spot on this list. They are not very high in nutrients so if you want to consume fruit for more vitamins and minerals there are better options.

100 grams of raw nectarine contains (16):

  • Net carbs: 8.9 grams
  • Calories: 44
  • Protein: 1.1 grams
  • Carbs: 10.6 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 1.7 grams
  • Fat: 0.3 grams
  • Vitamin C: 9% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Vitamin A: 7% of the DV
  • Potassium: 6% of the DV
  • Niacin: 6% of the DV
  • Vitamin E: 4% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

14. Grapefruit

Grapefruit is a popular food in the dieting and weight loss world. This is partly because of its presence in extreme diet plans like for example the military diet.

It may be a challenge to fit in but some grapefruit in limited portions can be keto-friendly.

100 grams of raw grapefruit contains (17):

  • Net carbs: 9.1 grams
  • Calories: 42
  • Protein: 0.8 grams
  • Carbs: 10.7 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 1.6 grams
  • Fat: 0.1 grams
  • Vitamin C: 52% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Vitamin A: 23% of the DV
  • Potassium: 4% of the DV
  • Thiamin: 3% of the DV
  • Vitamin B6: 3% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.

15. Apricot

Apricots are a type of stone fruit available all around the world. Dried apricots are a popular way to eat them but unfortunately not a low-carb-friendly one.

100 grams of raw apricot contains (18):

  • Net carbs: 9.2 grams
  • Calories: 48
  • Protein: 1.4 grams
  • Carbs: 11.2 grams
  • Part of the carbs that is fiber: 2 grams
  • Fat: 0.4 grams
  • Vitamin A: 39% of the DV (Daily Value)
  • Vitamin C: 17% of the DV
  • Potassium: 7% of the DV
  • Vitamin E: 4% of the DV
  • Vitamin K: 4% of the DV

And some other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts.